Forum Posts

Sue McCabe
Mar 30, 2020
In COVID-19 Forum
Kia ora koutou. The Govt has released the names of community organisations considered essential services: https://www.msd.govt.nz/about-msd-and-our-work/newsroom/2020/covid-19/list-of-social-sector-organisations-providing-essential-services.html This has ramifications for their funding and I'd be interested in funder views of this list including commentary on gaps and implications. Ngā mihi.
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Sue McCabe
Mar 20, 2020
In COVID-19 Forum
Kia ora. A few members have asked us if the Government's economic package covers not for profits, or just businesses (for example the wage subsidy when there is a loss in income). Government are going to clarify this for us. They've also said that the Government will be announcing a 'community response package', so keep your eyes open for that and we'll be sharing on social media etc when we see it. Ngā manaakitanga.
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Sue McCabe
Mar 18, 2020
In COVID-19 Forum
Kia ora funder members. We know there's a lot of activity occurring right now thinking about investment strategies and, on the other side of the coin, spending strategies. As I write Yvonne is busy arranging two zoom meetings that she'll email you about that will enable online funder sharing about their investment and funding activity. Please let us know via this funder-only hub if you've got anything you'd particularly like us to address. We'd also love funders to share their thinking about changes in their activity as a result of COVID-19, via this site, hence setting up this specific forum. Last week we started a webpage where we're posting some generic resources we think you may find helpful. https://philanthropy.org.nz/helpful-resources-covid-19/. Warmest regards.
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Sue McCabe
Nov 17, 2019
In Grantmaking practices
Realized Worth has just released research (backed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) looking at 40 platforms that support giving, volunteering and grant making. It's got an interesting market research overview, then compares the platforms. It's aim is to support decision making and 'right sized' investment in technology to support our work. It's attached or you can download your own copy from http://www.rw.institute/ . It mentions a number of platforms used by philanthropists and grant makers in NZ. Would welcome any comments.
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Sue McCabe
Mar 27, 2019
In Chch March 2019
Kia ora koutou. On our webinar yesterday Muhammed Shaakir advised us on giving in a way that is compliant with sharia law. He suggested that philanthropic funding that has been generated by interest may be problematic for Muslims to receive. He has since sought more advice and has subsequently advised his guidance was very cautious. It seems like philanthropic funding (including funds generated by interest) will be acceptable in the wake of the March 15 attack. However, longer term it is advisable that you check with Muslim recipients as to whether your funding will be acceptable as is, or may need some additional steps before it can be received. Direct giving to a mosque may require closer scrutiny as to the source. More detail is in the notes below. Key points from Muhammed Shaakir on the March 27 webinar for funders On the importance of sources of funding: - In general the source of funds is important to Muslim communities and there are red flags around funding generated by: o Interest-based transactions o Primarily from alcohol sales o Pork products o Any means of evil or oppression o Funds from gambling - Where the source of funds was interest-based transactions (as is common in philanthropy) there are actions that can be taken to ensure the funding is sharia compliant. For example, the funding is given to purchase something (even something worth much less). - However, Muhammed talked with contemporary scholars after the meeting and said this is a very cautious approach, and that, regarding funding to support recovery after the March 15 terrorist attack, philanthropic funders need not worry about being sharia-compliant. Their support is welcome. - Longer term, this is a grey area, and philanthropic funders are best to err on the side of caution and check with recipient groups on whether the funding is sharia compliant and, if not, what steps can be taken. On current funding needs: - Muslim can be reclusive and will be hesitant to take funds. It is helpful if you tell them that this money belongs to them. - Current funding needs are: o Housing, food, transportation and work o Support for women during the period of mourning (four months and ten days) o Some of the women have no skills to help them find employment, given the traditional nature of many of the households affected by March 15 o For a memorial o To make the Linwood Mosque more secure o Covering the travel costs of Muslims from outside of Chch that can provide comfort, solace, counselling and spiritual support to the Chch Muslim community. Funders can work with FIANZ on this. .
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Sue McCabe
Mar 25, 2019
In Chch March 2019
Kia ora members. I wrote this post on March 17 to help process my thinking about the terrorist attack. It's written from me (rather than from me in my PNZ capacity), but sharing anyway. https://medium.com/@sue.mccabe01/looking-at-what-lurks-within-to-stop-the-hurt-of-discrimination-8262a7f805e5
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Sue McCabe
Jan 29, 2019
In Grantmaking practices
On the 19th March a summit is being held in Wellington to discuss inclusive growth and explore the establishment of a NZ-based inclusive growth network. I'll attend given philanthropy is critical to achieving inclusive communities and reducing inequality. I'll report back, and I expect I'll see a few of our members there contributing their insight about the role of philanthropy in inclusive growth. I'd welcome comment if you're going, and your level of interest/activity in the concept of inclusive growth. More information follows, as does a link to the summit website: "The Inclusive Growth Summit is a joint initiative of Royal Society of Arts (Australia and New Zealand), Economic Development New Zealand (EDNZ) and the Local Government Think Tank. The Summit will bring together thought leaders, policymakers, and civil society organizations to consider the evolving policy and practice of inclusive growth, and to explore the establishment of a New Zealand-based inclusive growth network. "Inclusive growth has gained global traction in recent years, as international communities struggle to deal with the challenge of a sustained period of low growth and rising inequality. At this event, we look at what inclusive growth means in practice, and why it is critical to sustainable economic growth, addressing issues of inequality and poverty, and rebuilding inclusive communities. Questions we will be asking include: how can New Zealand take the lead on building a holistic approach to inclusive growth? How can we put shared prosperity at the heart of New Zealand’s economic and social policy-making? How do we use transformational interventions to tackle structural inequality?" http://rsaanz.org/igsummit2019/
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Sue McCabe
Dec 19, 2018
In Grantmaking practices
Longer term contracts, funding the full costs of services, less onerous reporting requirements, flexibility to try new things, and the ability to work with families and whanau more holistically were among the community sector’s key asks of government funders. The Social Investment Agency (SIA) has just released a summary of feedback from its engagement earlier this year over the Government’s approach to funding social wellbeing and the protection and use of data. SIA got feedback from not for profits, users of their services, and related stakeholders (including government agencies. What you told us categorised the findings into five key themes: - Establish a different kind of relationship across the sector - Enable locally-led solutions to deliver services that work - Build the skills, experience and capacity of the workforce to implement a wellbeing approach - Ensure data sharing, information and insights are a two-way street for all those involved - Develop funding and contracting models that promote innovative practice. The findings are relevant to philanthropists and grant makers given the interdependence of government with philanthropy in achieving societal impact; and also because many are relevant to any type of funder. Much of the feedback will not be new to our members, but reinforces commonly discussed issues. For example, in the area of funding and contracting, work is underway between some our members and Social Service Providers Aotearoa (SSPA) to undertake research on what a fully funded NGO community services sector might look like. In the funding and contracting space, quotes from community groups included: “We can’t plan and invest in our capability and the services we deliver when we have one-year contracts.” “Keep it local, build trust, have faith in us and let us prove it by doing. Create an enabling environment rather than a prescribed environment.” “Community organisations need investment to increase leadership and workforce capacity – and development for increased complexity.” The report contains a section on Māori perspectives: “Māori want more equal, and less transactional, relationships with government. Māori are looking for true partnership, to reflect the Treaty of Waitangi.” Māori said the whakapapa or history of the system needed acknowledgement, and funders need to understand how and why things are the way they are, what has been and is being tried, what has worked and what shows promise. The principle of mana enhancement was important. “There is no opportunity for mana when we are not asked what we think is right for our tamariki and mokopuna.” Pacific peoples’ perspectives included a call for funding and contracting models to be strength-based, focussing on how people and communities are flourishing, rather than what is not working. The findings of SIA’s engagement will now be fed into Government decision making. You can find SIA’s report and more information on next steps here: https://www.sia.govt.nz/our-work/yoursay/.
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Sue McCabe
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